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What Is Etizolam?

What Is Etizolam? | Just Believe Recovery PA

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If you or a loved one needs help with substance abuse and/or treatment, please contact Just Believe Recovery PA at (888) 380-0342. Our specialists can assess your needs and help you get the treatment that provides the best chance for your long-term recovery.

Etizolam is a prescription medication in a class of drugs known as thienodiazepines. These drugs are chemically similar to benzodiazepines (benzos), and as such, act as benzo analogs and may treat the same conditions.

Etizolam itself is most chemically similar to Halcion (triazolam). Much like Halcion and other benzos, etizolam has anxiolytic (anti-anxiety), amnesic, anticonvulsant, hypnotic, sedative, and skeletal muscle-relaxant properties. It works by enhancing the effects of a chemical called GABA in the brain and central nervous system (CNS).

Common brand names for etizolam include:

  • Depas
  • Etilaam
  • Etizest
  • Etizex
  • Pasaden
  • Sedekopan

Is It Legal?

Etizolam is not regarded as having an accepted medical use by the FDA in the United States. However, it is commonly prescribed in India, Italy, and Japan, and rarely prescribed in Germany, to treat anxiety disorders and insomnia.

In the U.S., it is currently not scheduled under the Controlled Substances Act on the federal level, though some states have opted to control it and make it illegal. As of March 2020, it is legal at the federal level for research purposes. The United Nations has placed it as a Psychotropic Schedule IV drug.

Etizolam Abuse and Effects

Just like other benzos, etizolam has a relatively high potential for abuse and can cause physical and psychological dependence and addiction. In recent years, etizolam has increasingly become a drug of concern. Many people acquire it at local retail shops or online through crypto markets as a “research chemical,” though it is most often purchased to be recreationally abused.

It can be found in bulk as bags of powder or pressed into tablet form. Since the sale and distribution of etizolam are not controlled, purchasing this substance is inherently risky.

Compared to another common benzo, diazepam (Valium), etizolam is reportedly between 6 and 10 times more potent. When taken orally as a pill, effects onset within about one half-hour to an hour and peak around 3-4 hours after ingestion.

Effects of etizolam abuse may include the following:

  • Confusion
  • Decreased libido
  • Depression
  • Drowsiness
  • Fainting
  • Headache
  • Muscle weakness
  • Poor coordination
  • Sedation
  • Slurred speech
  • Tremor
  • Visual disturbances

Etizolam Dependence and Withdrawal

Like other benzos, etizolam can cause dependence. Chemical or physical dependence happens when an individual’s body becomes accustomed to the presence of a drug and stops producing its own chemicals in response. If a dependent user attempts to quit cold turkey or cut back their dose, unpleasant, sometimes painful withdrawal symptoms will occur.

Symptoms of etizolam withdrawal can include the following:

  • Anxiety
  • Agitation
  • Confusion
  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Intense drug cravings
  • Irregular heart rhythms
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Panic attacks
  • Poor concentration
  • Seizures
  • Tremors

What Is Etizolam? | Just Believe Recovery PA

We Believe Recovery Is Possible For Everyone.
If you or a loved one needs help with substance abuse and/or treatment, please contact Just Believe Recovery PA at (888) 380-0342. Our specialists can assess your needs and help you get the treatment that provides the best chance for your long-term recovery.

Withdrawal symptoms associated with any benzo or benzo analog can be life-threatening. As such, detox from these substances should never be done at home. If you are dependent on a benzo, detox should only be attempted under the watchful eye of medical professionals at an accredited detox facility.

The withdrawal symptoms of etizolam typically begin within 24 to 48 hours of the last use and usually last around a week, but some can last for months. Some individuals with a severe dependence may experience post-acute withdrawal syndrome (PAWS). Individuals suffering from PAWS may have increased anxiety, depression, mood swings, and restlessness for a year or more after cessation of use.

Unfortunately, the unpleasantness of these symptoms is often enough to cause the individual to relapse in order to alleviate them. These relapsing cycles are often a warning sign that a full-blown addiction has set in.

Warning Signs of Addiction

Many of the signs that you or a loved one has a drug addiction are universal. Warning signs of addiction may include the following:

  • New or worsening legal or financial issues
  • Being unable to quit despite wanting to
  • Cravings for the drug of choice
  • Neglect of work, family, school, or social responsibilities
  • Persistent drug abuse despite the incurrence of adverse consequences
  • Increasing tolerance (more of the drug is required to experience effects)
  • Physical dependence

Etizolam Overdose

NOTE: An etizolam overdose is a medical emergency that requires immediate intervention, even if the side effects don’t appear serious at first.

Etizolam is a CNS depressant. Taking too much or taking it in combination with other CNS depressants, such as opioids, alcohol, or other benzos, can lead to a potentially life-threatening overdose.

Signs and symptoms of etizolam overdose may include:

  • Appearing to be drunk
  • Bluish lips or fingernails
  • Blurry or double vision
  • Cold, pale skin
  • Coma
  • Decreased alertness
  • Dizziness
  • Extreme drowsiness
  • General weakness
  • Hypothermia
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Passing out
  • Poor motor coordination
  • Rash
  • Side-to-side eye movements
  • Skeletal muscle loss
  • Slowed heart rate
  • Slowed or stopped breathing

Etizolam overdose is reversible through the use of a GABA receptor antagonist antidote called flumazenil. First responders in many places carry this. Administration of this life-saving medication can, however, rapidly induce withdrawal symptoms, including seizures.

Getting Treatment for Drug Abuse

Just Believe Recovery offers treatment programs in both residential and partial hospitalization formats. Clinically-proven services we offer include psychotherapy, 12-step groups, individual and family counseling, relapse prevention, aftercare planning, and more.

Our expert staff provides those we treat with all the tools and education they need to help them make a full recovery and achieve the sober and fulfilling lives they deserve.

We Believe Recovery Is Possible For Everyone.
If you or a loved one needs help with substance abuse and/or treatment, please contact Just Believe Recovery PA at (888) 380-0342. Our specialists can assess your needs and help you get the treatment that provides the best chance for your long-term recovery.

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